Kristin Texeira

04.+la+maison+de+charlotte_11+x+14+inches_oil+on+paper_2015+copy

Kristin Texeira is a young abstract painter originally from Massachusetts and currently based in Brooklyn. I discovered her work scrolling through Instagram and I immediately fell in love with her colors and her unique sensibility. Texeira’s work firstly reminded me to Wes Anderson’s pastel palette, but it is her combination of colors with a specific autobiographical memory what makes her work an absolute original world. This is a sincere universe you would not want to leave and that is easily to find related to.

I paint to provide proof—for myself and others—of existing in certain moments in time. I paint to capture, document, and preserve memories. I translate the essence of moments through color by mixing up the poetics of people and places.

Her artworks can be understood as an inventory of recollections. Where each color matches a person, a place, a conversation, a smell, a kiss, or a specific childhood memory. Her oil paintings in paper are proofs of what we were. Nostalgia is preserved in her imperfect geometrical pieces -but full of narrative content-, not in a sentimental way but with the aim of understanding ourselves. Kristin Texeira is turquoise, light green and pale pink. What color is your story?

Interview with Kristin Texeira

Irene Martínez: How much can we learn from ourselves through artworks?

 Kristin Texeira: Most of my pieces begin as free-writes. Sometimes as the mind flows I’m lost in a sea of rambles. Occasionally, however, I discover that a particular memory surfaces more often than once. This is how I know it’s important and needs to be recognized. I try to pick apart these trends and understand what the threads behind these memories are. That usually leads me to painting series. Also, specific colors seem to find me for certain reasons. When I first started painting I would always mix a particular blue to fill in the background of self portraits or still lives. Later in my career, I did a project investigating the colors of my grandmother’s home where I spent much of my childhood. I discovered the blues of her living room matched the blue that I always subconsciously mixed. Art allows you the space for secrets of the past to seep out and surprise you.

texeira 14-20
 

I.M: What role does the emotion of nostalgia play in your work?

K.T: Nostalgia is a story I’m always trying to tell. It is at the start of each piece. It is the reason why I paint. Colors come to mind when I interact with people and places and I used these colors as markers of time. I mix colors specific to a moment to create a gateway that allows me to revisit the memory again and again.

Finding a remedy for nostalgia is my motivation to travel back in time to uncover thoughts before they collect too much dust and to shake them out onto paper. Or even to steal nostalgia from the present to stick it down on paper and save it in color before it fades.

I.M: If you could travel in time what would you prefer: to relive an old memory or to discover a time you never lived?

K.T: I feel lucky enough to be able to travel back in time via paintings or old sketchbooks and I’m happy with my present place. I am curious about the idea of parallel universes though. Somedays I feel like I’m missing someone or some place and I can’t exactly explain what. I think about decisions in life that I’ve made and how when I made a choice maybe life split and now it overlaps and I still feel the strong emotions from a path that I’m not currently on. So, if I could, in some crazy way, I’d like to explore other layers in the universes of my own life.

balon+red

 

I.M: Where do you find beauty?

K.T: Little conversational exchanges with strangers.

Stories swapped over dinner tables.

Open spaces.

When I loose track of time.

 

I.M: A fictional character that inspires you

K.T: Eloise Wengler. She is one of J.D. Salinger’s characters from his short story “Uncle Wiggily in Connecticut”. I’m not entirely sure why I love her because she is described “jaded” and “unhappy”. But, her language is so clever and sarcastic and sharp. I think mostly I feel bad for her. She married a man because of a book that she finds out he never read. And I imagine how different things would have been if she could have ended up with the boy who thought being able to touch her stomach was the most beautiful thing in the world.

kt2

 

Well, wudga marry him for, then?” Mary Jane said.
“Oh, God! I don’t know. He told me he loved Jane Austen. He told me her books meant a great deal to him. That’s exactly what he said. I found out after we were married that he hadn’t even read one of her books. You know who his favourite author is?”
Mary Jane shook her head.
“L. Manning Vines. Ever hear of him?

J.D. Salinger

You can follow Kristin Texeira’s work here
Images courtesy of the artist.

 

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